Summer Market In Ilwaco Washington

The produce is fresh from the farm and the salmon chowder was really good, too. They ran out of garlic bread but that was OK. And you can’t beat the setting.
If you haven’t been yet, get all the information on our Events page.

Legos & Single Malt Scotch & the Ilwaco Railway & Navigation Company

The 125th anniversary of the Ilwaco Railway and Navigation Company.

See the latest exhibit at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum in Ilwaco.

What makes it a top pick? You can trick your kids into getting jazzed about history! Bring them for the Legos, stay for the geeky Northwest history! Can’t beat that.

When I first moved to the coast, I was lured in part by the fine single-malt scotch list at the Shelburne Inn. Haven’t been there for a while, but for historical research purposes, this is the weekend. The Shelburne Inn was one of the main stopping points for the railroad. Even today, the Shelburne makes a great refueling stop.

The first run from Ilwaco to Long Beach was July 19, 1888.

Clamshell Railroad mapYou can learn a lot more about this little railroad that, most of the time, could. Read The Railroad That Ran by the Tide: Ilwaco Railroad and Navigation Co. of the State of Washington by Raymond J. Feagans.

The reason we say it’s the railroad that could, most of the time, is that it had the nickname “Irregular, Rambling and Never-Get-There Railroad.”

Another great source for history buffs is also called “The Railroad That Ran By The Tide” by Peter Marsh. Read an excerpt here:

It was in 1930 that the “Clamshell Railroad” went out of business, leaving just a few reminders of the part it played in the history of the lower Columbia. The story of this unique train service began back in 1865, when the propeller steamboat U.S.Grant began regular service to Bakers Bay.

Tall Ships on the Columbia: Fire When Ready

Lady Washington StampUpdate to “The Passage” post
This is a brand new video from our blog friend, Portdaddia, who took the family on the Lady Washington “Battle Cruise” from Hood River, OR this weekend.

The Lady Washington was rigged according to custom of the 1780s with 168 different lines, crewed by 14. The Hawaiian Chieftain was circa 1850, a bit smaller, and needed only 10 crew with fewer sails and lines.

The captain was a professional and the remaining crew were volunteers, the newest having to pay to sail on the ship for two weeks to gain basic skills. The crew were not characters in an historical re-creation, rather people trying to give tourists a taste of sailing from a few centuries ago, wearing traditional garments and sensible footwear.

Read the complete Portdaddia post from June 3, 2013 here.

The Passage

Original post from May 6, 2013

It’s been more than ten years since I’ve been aboard the tall ship, Lady Washington. My brief visit was during one of her stays at the Columbia River Maritime Museum.

I was working for KVAS Radio at 1490 Marine Drive and as part of the media stop got to stay onboard for one night as a crew member.

We all were responsible for a shift as a night watchman Staying awake wasn’t a problem as the below-deck hammocks aren’t built for comfort.

If the same protocol was in place now as when the Lady Washington’s predecessor was at sea, punishment for falling asleep on watch could be severe:

It is not the easiest matter in the world to get these sleeping hundreds out of their hammocks and at their posts on deck, in a reasonable time, and without noise or disorder. There are always skulkers, who, secure from passing observation, prefer the comforts of additional moments between their blankets, to a speedy exposure to the weather; To break up this practice, no means of punishment tried, has ever succeeded, but the application of the lash. -Naval handbook, 1885

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